Roche Limit Vol. One: Anomalous combines philosophy, science fiction, detective fiction, and yes a zombie apocalypse. Is it good?

The opening sequence of Roche Limit reminds me a lot of the original Bioshock. A wealthy man with a larger than life vision sets out to change the world and along the path it all goes wrong. The similarities end there. Where Bioshock examines the philosophy of human organizations, Moreci examines the ideas of fate, identity, and our perception of the world around us.

Each book except for the last one begins with the founder of Roche Limit, Langford Skaargred, breaking the fourth wall through an audio/visual recording where he addresses many of the aforementioned high-brow topics. However, he does use a number of the main characters to also address these topics and there is a significant plot line dedicated to self-discovery and what it means to be human.

Outside of the philosophy, Moreci and artist Vic Malhotra build a compelling world full of drug dealers, addicts, a protective Madam, and even a mad scientist. The world is seedy with good people few and far between. Even the characters who are relatable have been affected by the violent culture on Dispater, the planet where the colony of Roche Limit is located. One of the best examples of the unruly and rough culture is during an interrogation at the local watering hole.

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