Seth Abbot’s war has begun as he takes on his first mission against the Red Coats in the company of the Green Mountain Boys. All the while, his new bride, Mercy, is home alone to care and fend for herself. Is it good?

Rebels #2 reads like a number one issue. On the opening page, Brian Wood uses heavy exposition to introduce new readers to the story, emphasizing the location where the battles are being fought and whom they are against. Wood then leads into an action sequence as Seth Abbot and the Green Mountain Boys infiltrate a Red Coat encampment.

Wood’s dialogue—or, more accurately, monologue—within the encampment reads more like a supervillain pontificating than a British soldier attempting to subdue a rebel. He goes from questioning Seth in an attempt to figure out who he is, right into describing how he is the lowest of the low in society. It doesn’t stop there; the next line is the masterstroke! He reveals his master plan: no matter what happens, the entire camp will wake up at the sound of gunfire. It just doesn’t flow at all. Instead of attempting to raise an alarm, he goes on an evil 18th century monologue.

Despite the monologue, Andrea Mutti’s artwork created a sense of tension and risk. You weren’t sure whether or not Abbot was going to come away unscathed. He was behind enemy lines and had been caught.

Continue reading at Adventures in Poor Taste!

(Visited 229 times, 1 visits today)