Check out our other reviews of Demonic (1)

We all have that unsatisfiable itch in our minds, some days it becomes worse than others. There are days when that little voice speaks to us clear as day, and it’s scary. Maybe someone cut you off, or maybe you just had a bad day and need to release. Whatever it may be, we all have that demon within us who is patient and waits until the time is right, to crawl his way right out of you. For most of us, we’re able to keep our inner demons chained away in the back of our subconscious, though over time, it can take its toll on us. We can keep the monster hidden from the world, but for others, they break down, the walls that protected the world from their demon crumbles and all that is left in it’s wake is tragedy and bloodshed. Demonic #1 takes this idea, adds a twist and explores it. It echoes the Killing Joke with a theme about just one day going bad and turning from hero to villain.

Demonic #1 written by Christopher Sebela puts you right into the life of a police officer. You’re thrown straight into the action from the beginning, while at the same time you’re given snippets of information about the main protagonist, Scott. Early on you learn that not everything is as quiet as normal for our main character. His life is full of hardships that would break many men, as well as consequences that most of us have experienced. As the story goes along you begin to realize he carries the weight of the world on his shoulders, and Sebela builds to that character defining moment where he must make a choice. It’s at this moment that the inner demon takes it’s cue.

Sebela does a wonderful job of exploring the helplessness of someone on the brink who is willing to do whatever it takes to protect what he holds dear. He continues this explore this dynamic as the issue progresses really diving into Scott’s character and pushing him even further. While Sebela does a great job at exploring Scott’s character through his willingness to push his own inner boundaries. Unfortunately, he does lack in exploring other parts of Scott’s character and life especially his marriage which is one of the main sources that feed Scott’s demon.

Demonic #1

Artist Niko Walter uses what I can only describe as a style akin to old style comics like Dick Tracy. The details he uses, both visually show you Sebela’s dialogue, as well as provide a sense of mystery as your eyes explore the world of Demonic #1. He expertly captures Scott’s conflicting thoughts and actions in the artwork. To do this he employs both rough drawings of his facial features, and the surrounding environment when the story takes Scott into stressful situations.

Colorist Dan Brown uses yellows throughout the story echoing the ”Golden Age” style art work. Not only does he use yellows throughout, but the issue uses a distinct yellow filter that creates a classical era vibe, while maintaining to the reader that we’re in them modern time. Though I wished some of the blood would have been spared the yellow tint.

Demonic #1

The Verdict

In Demonic #1 we are brought into a familiar world where hands are pulling people in many different directions. Sebela takes us on an interesting exploration of the mind of those who allow their inner demons to run free. But he balances this with examining the character of someone who will do what they feel is right. There were certain character details that were lacking, but overall the writing was good. Niko Walter and Dan Brown create visuals that keep the your eyes glued to each page. However some of the color could have been scaled back a bit. It was fun to see how a single theme could play out in one issue.

Comic Book Review: Demonic #1
Pros
  • The writing was solid,and complex
  • The Illustration was strong and with the coloring, was a nice point at an older style of comics
  • Use of yellow the set the mental state of the main character was good
Cons
  • Details were missing dealing with the protagonist that are important to the reader
9Overall Score
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