Len Wein, the legendary comic book creator who co-created Wolverine and Swamp Thing died at the age of 69. Along with Wolverine and Swamp Thing, Wein created a number of X-Men including Nightcrawler, Storm, and Colossus. He would also edit Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons’ iconic series Watchmen. His work got him inducted into the Will Eisner Comic Book Hall of Fame in 2008.

Len was born in New York on June 12, 1948. By the time he was a teenager, he was taking tours of the DC Comics offices. “His connection to DC Comics goes back to the early 1960s, when he and his friend [and future collaborator] Marv Wolfman would take a tour of the DC offices that was offered once a week,” according to DC Comics.

Wolfman and Lein would then sell their first scripts to DC Comics in 1968. Wolfman and Lein would go on to introduce the Teen Titans creating Starfire and Red Star. He would also apply his work to Marvel’s Daredevil with Roy Thomas in 1970.

Just a year later he would team up with Bernie Wrightson to create Swamp Thing in 1971. He then worked with John Romita Sr. and Herb Trimpe to create Wolverine who debuted in The Incredible Hulk #180.

Wein was also influential on Batman. In Batman #307, his first issue of Batman he created Wayne Foundation executive, Lucius Fox. He also co-created Batman villain and now ally Clayface.

DC Entertainment president Diane Nelson described Len’s work with DC Comics, “He wrote or edited almost every major DC character — there’s hardly a facet of DC’s world that Len didn’t touch.”

Hugh Jackman who portrays Wolverine in Fox’s X-Men films remembered Len Wein:

Others also remembered Len and his incredible work:

Len died in the Los Angeles area. His cause of death has not been reported, but the Washington Post reports he was in an “extended hospital stay in recent weeks.” In 2015, Wein did undergo quintuple bypass heart surgery.

Len is survived by his wife Christine Valada and their children.

  • Damn! I’ll miss him. He was a great talent, far better than the SJWs presently wrecking the industry.