Marvel artist Jon Malin who is the current artist on Cable and recently did a variant cover of Marvel Two-In-One took a big stand against social justice warriors and their infestation of the comic book industry.

Malin spoke with DC Comics artist Ethan Van Sciver and described SJWs (social justice warriors) as those who seek to “marginalize a group of people through identity and use the other people against them.” He also describes them as people who use “less than noble means to get their ideology through [by] silencing people.”

After an interview with Yellow Flash, Jon Malin was asked, “Aren’t the X-Men LITERALLY Social Justice Warriors?”

Malin responded, “X-Men are closer to Jews in SJW Hitler’s Germany fighting for freedom because they see ideologues rising, silencing them, weaponizing hate, racism and socialism against the people they claim are the root of social ills. SJWs are not Nazis but Nazis are SJWs and X-Men aren’t SJWs.”

To no one’s surprise people suggested he should lose his job over the Tweet. Even Star Trek: Deep Space Nine actress Chase Masterson got in on the act.

 

While many were suggesting Malin lose his job over the Tweet, others also supported him and even stated they would start buying Marvel Comics again.

He said, “Glad to expose the vipers nest that is the growing SJW infestation of this industry that is killing creative voices that politically difer (sp), afraid to take creative chances for fear of the slightest offense including attacking a 95 YO Stan Lee & closing comic shops everywhere.”

And Malin is not the first – and certainly will not be the last in today’s political climate – to be attacked for his beliefs. Just this month comic book creator Will Caligan lost his job for voicing his conservative beliefs on social media.

But Malin’s greatest response might have been when someone accused him of being dismissive by using the term SJW. They also said that comic books should be the most diverse and inclusive industry out there.

Malin’s response was perfect, “Comics likely are the most diverse and inclusive industry you’ll find. It’s very design allows for anyone to see a hole and create a product putting it into the market and contribute a representation. You can be the solution here, you don’t just have to be a spectator.”

He’s right on the money here. If you want to see different types of people whether it’s their ethnicity or their ideas, you can go out and make a comic book about it. No one is stopping you. You just have to do it.

No one should have to fear whether they will lose their job because they politically disagree with someone or that their beliefs are different than someone else. It’s wrong and not very tolerant whatsoever.

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About The Author

John F. Trent

John is the Editor here at Bounding Into Comics. He is a massive Washington Capitals fan, lover of history, and likes to dabble in economics and philosophy.

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