‘Star Wars: Timelines’ Book Destroys Yet Another Popular Character

Split image of Mon Mothma and Starkiller Base from 'Star Wars,' Disney
Split image of Mon Mothma and Starkiller Base from 'Star Wars,' Disney

Not content to obliterate the fan-favorite legacies of characters like Luke Skywalker, Princess Leia and Han Solo, the creatively-bankrupt pseudo-writers helming Disney-owned Star Wars have once again decided to focus their target on yet another beloved character. This time, Mon Mothma gets the chop, courtesy of an attempt to explain away one of the dumbest plot arcs of the ill-fated Star Wars: Episode VII – The Force Awakens.

Mon Mothma expresses sorrow over the death of Bothan spies in 'Star Wars: Return of the Jedi' (1983), Disney+

Mon Mothma expresses sorrow over the death of Bothan spies in ‘Star Wars: Return of the Jedi’ (1983), Disney+

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In the first film of Disney’s much-loathed sequel trilogy, the First Order sets its sights on Hosnian Prime, obliterating it outright using the power of the newly-operational Starkiller Base. That, in turn, not only wipes out the last remaining defensive fleet of the New Republic, but its entire governmental system at the same time. The only thorn left in the First Order’s side at that point is a new Resistance, spearheaded by Princess Leia, who stood in direct opposition to this empty-headed idea.

In the book Star Wars: Timelines, the explanation given is that Mon Mothma swayed the New Republic to decommission the vast majority of its defensive fleet, for the purpose of demilitarizing the known galaxy, which came to be known as the “Military Disarmament Act.” Under this character retcon, Mon Mothma adopted an unrealistic, utopian vision for the galaxy where every dispute would be settled through diplomacy and democratic negotiations. While it still held a small patrol fleet backed up by New Republic Rangers, it wasn’t nearly enough to combat a galactic-sized threat like the First Order.

The Hosnian System is destroyed by the First Order in 'Star Wars: Episode VII - The Force Awakens,' (2015), Disney+

The Hosnian System is destroyed by the First Order in ‘Star Wars: Episode VII – The Force Awakens,’ (2015), Disney+

This narrative has been touched upon in the recent third season of The Mandalorian, where the decommissioning of wartime ships on both sides is actively being performed on Coruscant. This anti-war sentiment is a typical theme of Left-wing ideologues who fail to factor in the necessity of a strong military presence to deal with real-world threats from those who do not share a pacifist viewpoint. This sentiment is mirrored in the real world by a Left who believe it can make nice with geopolitical foes like Iran, China, and Russia, only to stand beside themselves when it all falls apart.

This identical sentiment in Star Wars allowed the First Order to capitalize on the inherent weakness of a New Republic that rose from the ashes of violent rebellion against a totalitarian foe. It’s one of the most bizarre takes from Disney-led Star Wars to date, but not the least bit surprising, given the people in charge of this new narrative. Under Disney’s wing, Lucasfilm has been retrograded to a pool of childish Woke Leftism trying its best to push silly notions on a moviegoing public.

The front cover of 'Star Wars: Timelines,' Disney

The front cover of ‘Star Wars: Timelines,’ Disney

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It also destroys Mon Mothma altogether by compromising the strength of her character; one who fought valiantly by leading the Rebellion against the Galactic Empire. A person who had gone through that much struggle, personal sacrifice, and strife would easily recognize the need for a strong force to deter would-be conquerors from following in the Empire’s footsteps. Disney-led Star Wars has so far shown the New Republic to be entirely blasé over even the slightest hint of the Imperial Remnant seeking to regroup into a new collective threat.

This is a far cry from the New Republic of the Expanded Universe, which has since been de-canonized. In that timeline, the New Republic was very much aware of the threat posed by the Imperial Remnant under Grand Admiral Thrawn’s leadership, and viewed itself as especially vulnerable after such a hard-fought war. This “Legends” version of Mon Mothma put the New Republic above her own interests, and battled one threat after another, whilst simultaneously trying to hold the new government together.

Mon Mothma learns of Grand Admiral Thrawn's existence in the Dark Horse Comics adaptation of 'Star Wars: Dark Force Rising,' Marvel

Mon Mothma learns of Grand Admiral Thrawn’s existence in the Dark Horse Comics adaptation of ‘Star Wars: Dark Force Rising,’ Marvel

She also fought against threats from within, particularly Borsk Fey’lya, an ambitious Bothan with his own vision of post-Imperial galactic governance. By contrast, the Mon Mothma of Disney’s Star Wars timeline is an antithetical dreamer and a coward; one who sat back and demilitarized her entire fledgling government in the vain hope that everyone else would share her campfire bonding political rhetoric.

It could be argued that the First Order’s attack against Hosnian Prime was meant to showcase the futility of such stupid reasoning, but that doesn’t change the destruction of Mon Mothma’s character. She’s the polar opposite of the person expanded upon in Star Wars novels and ancillary material that predated Disney’s acquisition of the franchise, and it seems largely by design. But, this is nothing new from Disney’s Lucasfilm, which, so far, has decided to run every single character against his or her particular grain, for no apparent reason, while destroying them in the process.

Mon Mothma addresses the Rebellion before the Battle of Endor in 'Star Wars: Return of the Jedi' (1983), Disney+

Mon Mothma addresses the Rebellion before the Battle of Endor in ‘Star Wars: Return of the Jedi’ (1983), Disney+

It has long been said that for all its warts and blemishes, the Expanded Star Wars Universe material was, is, and continues to be leaps and bounds beyond anything that has come out of Lucasfilm under Disney’s control. While the corporation keeps incessantly cherry-picking fan favorite characters from that universe for the sake of capitalizing on actual good ideas, it simultaneously wrecks existing characters by putting them in the hands of deconstructionists and political zealots with an agenda to push.

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